TOP 9 Best 4-Weight Fly Rods on the Market (The 2024 Edition)

When fishing smaller waters, it pays to have a light and a little more agile rod.

The 4-weight fly rods offer an excellent compromise between size, pulling power, and fly presentation.

This article will show you some of the best out there and give you a quick rundown of what I look for when choosing.

Read on to find out more…

Our 3 Favorite 4-Weight Fly Rods for 2024

ProductAwardOur RatingReview
Orvis Recon Fly Rod
Orvis Recon Fly Rod
Best All-Rounder
4.7/5.0
Read review
Temple Fork Outfitters Pro 2 Fly Rod
Redington Classic Trout rod
Best for Beginners & On a Budget
4.6/5.0
Read review
Thomas & Thomas Avantt Series Fly Rod
Thomas & Thomas Avantt Series Fly Rod
Best of The Best
4.8/5.0
Read review

The Orvis Recon is a great rod for every 4 weight situation. It is as light as can be, beautiful to look at, and man does it perform on the water.

Accuracy at short and long distances is a breeze with the Recon and in its durable build, lovely reel seat, rod tube, and 25 year guarantee, and you are onto a winner.

It is not often a fly rod wins two categories, but the Temple Fork Outfitters Pro 2 has done it. By far the best performing rod for the money and one that is forgiving for beginners to use, it is a delight.

It casts beautifully for beginners and pros, is accurate, pushes distances, plus it is lightweight and durable. You can’t ask for much more at this price!

The Thomas & Thomas Avantt 4 weight is incredible but expensive. Its feel and casting performance across all distances is impeccable. Dropping a small fly with pinpoint accuracy at 30 to 60 feet is what it is all about.

Throw in the stunning design, durable build, low weight, and top of the line extras, and you can see why it costs so much. But, if you want a 4 weight for life, this is going to be that fly rod.

How to Choose the Best 4 Weight Fly Rod – A Quick Guide

There are some key things you need to consider in order to buy a good 4 weight fly rod. We discuss these in a lot of detail after the reviews, but here is a quick summary for you.

  • Action: The action of a rod denotes its stiffness and with 4 weights, a fast or medium fast action gives you the line speed to put small flies where you want them.
  • Weight: You will be casting your 4 weight all day. You want it to be light to avoid any arm aches.
  • Portability: Look for 4 pieces rods that you can easily store in your car or take on a flight, it makes life easier.
  • Durability: Graphite blacks, titanium guides, cork handles, anodized aluminum reel seats are the things to look for as they last forever with care.
  • Reel Seat: A reliable locking reel seat is a must. You don’t want your reel falling off mid cast.
  • Extras: Rod tubes, lifetime warranties, and zero-friction guides are the little extras that you want to come with your rod.

If the 4 weight fly rod you are looking at meets all these needs, then you have found one that is worth considering spending some cash on

Top 9 Best 4 Weight Fly Rods for 2024

Redington Classic Trout Fly Rod

Suppose you are looking for ‘middle of the road’ bulletproof quality at a reasonable price. In that case, Redington will always have you covered. They offer very good performance at a reasonable price.

The proof?

Check this out.

This 9 foot, four-piece rod is just the ticket. For the money, it is one of the best 4 wt fly rods out there.

When it comes to casting, it is right in the sweet spot. The Toray graphite blank is pretty easy to control with a moderate action, which will aid casting accuracy, especially for beginners. I like a moderate action in a 4wt rod. It gives a decent amount of pulling power without the rod being too heavy.

It also has one or two nice features, normally found on rods that are much more expensive.

Like?

I love the alignment dots on each section, and the dark clay brown blank looks pretty classy. Go towards the butt end, and you’ll find a high-quality cork handle, finished with a rosewood reel insert.

Oh, and it comes in a ballistic nylon rod tube, nice and durable for when you are traveling to the water.

Pros

  • Great looks.
  • Good casting action.
  • Really affordable price.

Cons

  • Some might find a moderate blank a little too slow for certain types of fishing (like Euro nymphing).

Takeaway

For the money, this is a great rod and performs more like something that would cost upward of $400. If you are buying for the first time, this would be a great place to start.

Okuma Crisium Graphite 4wt Fly Rod

Ok, I’m just going to put it out there.

Okuma is a budget brand. For the money, this is never going to compete with the big names like Orvis and Redington.

But do you know what…

I actually really like it. This 4wt rod would be perfect for beginners who are just starting their journey.

Here’s why.

The rod is pretty lightweight, with fast action. For those learning to cast, it can be difficult to generate enough energy. A more ‘whippy’ rod will get that fly line shooting nicely.

As with more expensive fly rods, it also features a rosewood reel insert and a titanium oxide stripper guide.

But there are a few downsides.

First, the rod is a two-piece. This means it is slightly more difficult to store and transport… And much easier to trap in a car door.

Second, it features stainless steel snake guides. Steel and water don’t really mix, so you’ll have to make sure the rod is bone dry before putting it back into its bag.

Pros

  • This rod is really cheap.
  • Fast action, great for casting small dries and nymphs.
  • Pretty lightweight.

Cons

  • It’s a two-piece rod.
  • It won’t last as long as others on this list.

Takeaway

Look, you get what you pay for. This rod would be a great choice for those looking to get fly fishing on the cheap.

You will want to upgrade eventually, but it is pretty good for a rough and ready solution or a backup rod. If you are looking for a strictly budget fly rod, you might enjoy this article here on the cheapest fly rods around.

Sage Fly Fishing Pulse Fly Rod

Ah, Sage!

These rods are hand-made in the USA. That will always get a big tick in the box for me. Years ago, Sage used to be one of the biggest names in fly fishing. With the rise of some other big players, they seem to have taken a back seat.

Which is a shame…

As they make awesome rods for fly fishing.

Here’s proof.

This rod excels in the looks department. The blank is a sort of golden-green color. Or ‘lichen’ to use sage’s terminology. Combined with olive thread wraps and a black trim gives a really classy look.

It’s different, and I like it.

It isn’t just about looks either. It casts like a dream. The fast action blank is perfect for accelerating small flies a long way.

The half wells high-quality cork handle feels nice in hand. When combined with a smart aluminum uplocking reel seat and dark rosewood insert, this rod screams quality.

To finish the entire package of this 4 piece rod comes with its very own Cordoba rod tube.

Pros

  • One of the best casters on my list.
  • Simply stunning in the looks department.
  • Included rod tube.
  • Premium construction.

Cons

  • Premium price.

Takeaway

When you get quality as good as this, I don’t mind paying a little extra. Is it worth it? I think so. If you have a little more to spend, this 4wt rod is excellent.

Orvis Recon Fly Rod

Orvis Recon Fly Rod

While we are looking at premium brands, I’d like to show you this.

And I’ll be honest…

It is expensive. But I can say, hand on heart, that this might be one of the best 4 wt fly rods I’ve ever seen.

Here’s what I love.

First off, it is supremely lightweight. It feels like you are holding nothing. If you were to pair this with a lightweight reel, you’d have one of the best fly rod combos on the market.

Oh man, that cast!

The casting action is perfect; the rod action sits somewhere between medium and fast, giving a nice blend of distance and accuracy.

In the looks department, it is a supermodel. The olive matte blank with a slight green note looks great, and it is functional too. Matte finishes reduce flashes, so no spooked fish.

You know me, I’m all about the little extras.

And this rod has plenty.

A Pewter finish aluminum reel seat gives the rod a real quality look, throw in some gorgeous looking silver snake stripping and snake guides, and you’ve got an unsurpassed package.

Pros

  • Near perfect casting action.
  • Supremely lightweight.
  • Beautiful looks…

Cons

  • Again, the price is the only downside.

Takeaway

If you are looking for a great 4wt fly rod, then this is about as good as it gets. Seriously, it has everything and would be great in a variety of situations.

You won’t be disappointed, and although it is expensive, I think it is worth every penny.

St. Croix Mojo Trout Fly Rod

St. Croix Mojo Trout Fly Rod

Alright, let’s be real.

Not everyone has the option to blow $500+ on a fly rod.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t get great quality.

St. Croix offers something that is nearly as good as some of the Orvis range, at a fraction of the price.

The reason you pay less? It isn’t a ‘designer’ name… But it is still relatively lightweight and casts extremely well. Again, you’ll find a moderate to fast action with a pretty slim, high modulus, graphite blank.

One really nice feature is the line guides. They are sea guide snake guides with a non-stick coating, allowing you to wring every yard of distance out of each cast.

As with some of the more premium offerings, the rod also features an up-locking aluminum reel seat.

I like the added touch of a kigan hook keeper too, perfect for storing your fly as you make your way along a river looking for the fish.

Pros

  • Great value.
  • Lightweight blank with a nice action.
  • Performs over and above its price point.

Cons

  • The only thing I don’t like is the color of the blank… But that’s just me being fussy.

Takeaway

If you don’t want to be spending fortunes, this is one of the best 4 wt fly rods for the money. Ok, so you won’t get a designer label… Do you think the fish care about what name is printed on your rod? A great all-rounder at a good price.

Orvis Clearwater Fly Rod

Orvis Clearwater Fly Rod

If you like having a designer label but don’t like paying designer prices, I’ve got something for you.

Check this out…

An Orvis rod for less than $300? Where do I sign?

Right here… It’s awesome. The Clearwater range is one of Orvis’s cheapest rods… But don’t let the price fool you! This shares many attributes of rods that are at least double the cost.

Here’s what I mean.

The black chrome finished blank is slim, lightweight, and has a medium action. The white accents of the logo and embossing on the butt section really pop too. It looks great.

Make your way up the rod. You’ll find chrome stripping guides with a ceramic insert, giving a great deal of corrosion resistance and minimal line friction.

The black nickel aluminum seat will keep your reel locked and secure. It is also pretty bulletproof when it comes to corrosion.

Anything else?

Yeah, it comes with a nice grey tube, so you can keep your rod safe and secure on your travels.

Pros

  • Great looks.
  • Excellent value, one of the best 4 wt fly rods for the money.
  • Really durable.

Cons

  • Its medium action, this might not suit a beginner casting style.

Takeaway

For me, this is the pick of the bunch. You are getting a tried and tested fly fishing brand, at the kind of money you’ll pay for ‘no name’ budget rods. The performance isn’t that far from the more expensive Orvis rods, and you’ll be using this for years to come.

G. Loomis Asquith All Water Fly Rod

G Loomis is a part of Shimano, and like Shimano, they are all about quality. The Asquith is one of their newer additions to their rods and it is one of the best fly rods in the world, period!

Their unique build features Spiral X technology which is a 3 layer build that provides an incredible amount of strength and power in their blanks without adding extra weight.

What you end up with is a fast/medium action rod with a ton of power that casts like a dream, but is super light.

Short close casts are easy, so are long casts over 60 feet, and all with pinpoint accuracy. Add in the low weight, and you can cast all day without any aches.

The feel of this rod is perfect for dry flies, which is a 4 weight’s ideal world. The medium action provides a lot of feel so you can drop a large or micro dry with the utmost delicacy to big spooky trout.

The one downside is the price. The Asquith is the most expensive 4 weight fly rod on the market, but it is one of the best and you get a lifetime warranty with it too.

Pros

  • Casts beautifully.
  • 4 piece for portability.
  • Incredibly tough and amazing quality.
  • Delicate, accurate casts.
  • Great for dry fly fishing.
  • Lifetime warranty.

Cons

  • Very expensive.

Takeaway

If you are looking for a 4 weight to use for life and hand down to the next generation, the Asquith is it. Built incredibly tough while being light and providing incredible casting performance, it is hard to beat. The price tag is a little terrifying though!

Thomas & Thomas Avantt Series Fly Rod

Thomas & Thomas are one of the great fly rod manufacturers that make incredible fly rods and the Avantt Series is no different.

The Avantt Series 4 weight is a beautiful fly rod with an old school look that is filled with modern technology.

The blank is built with graphite and their StratoTherm Resin technology which translates to a very light weight rod that loads super fast. Casting these rods at any distances from 30 to 60 feet is a breeze, and the accuracy is on point too.

The Avantt 4 weight comes in 3 lengths, 8’6 for dry flies and 9’ for an all-around nymphing and dry fly rod. It features titanium-frame ceramic stripping guides and snake ECOating guides, plus a stunning reel seat.

It is a 4 piece rod that comes with a rod tube, so is as portable as can be and it comes with a lifetime warranty.

Unfortunately, you don’t get this kind of quality without paying for it and the Avantt 4 weight fly rod is one of the more expensive on the market.

Pros

  • Lightweight with a lot of feel.
  • Great castability from 30 to 60 feet.
  • 2 different lengths to choose from.
  • Strong durable build.
  • Excellent accuracy.
  • Great looking.

Cons

  • Expensive.

Takeaway

The Avantt Series 4 weight is a great fly rod. It is beautiful to look at, light, and delivers across the board when it comes to performance. No matter whether you need to deliver your fly with pinpoint accuracy at 30 or 60 feet, it does the job.

Nice additions like the Black Ash reel seat, quality guides, lifetime warranty, and rod tube make it worth the expensive price.

Temple Fork Outfitters Pro 2 Fly Rod

The Temple Fork Outfitters Pro 2 4-weight fly rod is the perfect rod for beginners or pros shopping on a budget.

What makes the Pro 2 such a delight is how forgiving it is to cast with. The medium/fast action blank suits a range of casting strokes, giving pros the performance they need while also dropping flies in the zone for beginners.

It casts excellently and accurately at all distances and generates a surprising amount of line speed at long distances, especially considering the price.

All the extras on this fly rod are excellent too. The guides are low-friction and durable, the reel seat is anodized aluminum and reliable, and it comes with a lifetime warranty.

The only downside to this rod is that a rod tube is not included. But, you can always use one from another fly rod you own. Or, buying one with the rod is a great idea, especially considering how affordable it is.

Pros

  • Ideal for beginners.
  • Forgiving to cast with.
  • Great casting distances.
  • Accurate on short and long casts.
  • Durable low-friction guides.
  • Tough, reliable, ​​anodized aluminum reel seat.
  • Lifetime warranty.
  • Affordable for the quality.
  • Comes in 3 lengths to choose from.

Cons

  • Rod tube not included.

Takeaway

Temple Fork Outfitters Pro 2 4-weight is a delight in every way. The affordable price, its casting performance, and all the extras are world class and suit every angler from beginners to pros, and it won’t break the bank.

Buyer’s Guide to 4 Weight Fly Rods

There are plenty of options above, but how do you know what’s hot and what’s not?

Here’s a quick guide to what I look for when choosing a rod:

fly fishing rod and trout in fishing landing net

Where are 4 Weight Fly Rods Best Suited?

The answer to this question is actually the deciding factor in which weight rod to use.

A four-weight fly rod is ideally suited to fishing smaller rivers and still waters. It isn’t quite as light as a dedicated nymphing rod. These tend to be wt 2 or 3. It will still allow you to cast a weight forward line pretty easily.

One of the key advantages of a 4 wt rod is that it will also allow you to cast a sinking line.

If you are looking to fish streamers or slightly larger lures, this is about as light as you can go. If you want to know why sinking lines only go down to wt 4, I’ve got a whole guide about them right here.

What Size Fish Can You Catch on a 4 Wt Fly Rod?

The truth.

You could probably catch a range of sizes from small half-pound brownies all the way up to double-figure rainbows. The rod certainly won’t break…

But…

It will be a bit of a struggle if you do hook into a monster.

I want to talk to you about something important that you must consider:

If you fish to catch and release, then you really should consider going heavier in terms of rod weight.

Why?

Listen, we all love it when a fish puts up a great fight. It is one of the fun things about fishing. However, a lighter rod makes it harder to pull in larger fish. This prolongs a fight. The problem comes when the fight goes on too long.

Sportfish, in particular, trout, can literally fight themselves to death. If you return them, they no longer have the energy to swim or pump water over their gills, which means they will die. This isn’t so much of a problem if you are killing the fish to eat. Still, if you are returning them, it is kinder to use a rod that keeps the fight as short as possible, so the fish has a greater chance of survival once returned.

I don’t want to come off all preachy, but we should respect the fish that we catch and protect our sport for the future.

man fly fishing in river holding fly rod with reel

Action

This one is a biggie.

That’s why I included it first. You can have all the features, fancy names, and clever designs. But if your rod action is off, it isn’t going to work.

The aim of your rod is to cast a light fly and cast it well. 4wt fly rods are meant for smaller flies on smaller waters. To do that, you are going to need a rod that is quick enough to keep up.

For that reason, I normally recommend choosing a rod with fast action. However, this is down to your casting style, and I find that some guys prefer medium.

If you are in doubt, go between the two and get the best of both worlds. Medium fast suits the vast majority of casting styles.

If you are looking for something really lightweight, it might be worth going down to a 3 wt rod. I’ve got an article devoted to 3 weight fly rods right here.

Weight

I mean this in two ways.

First the physical heaviness of the rod. Fly fishing is super active, and you are going to be casting a lot. A few ounces here and there can make all the difference.

Second, you need to make sure that 4 weight is right for the conditions and venue.

As a maximum, you might get away with using 4 weight on larger waters, but to be honest, they are better suited to smaller venues.

If you need to beef up your ideas, check my article on the best 5 weight fly rods.

fisherman holding fly fishing rod

Multi-Piece Fly Rods

Back when I started fly fishing, there was one option and one option only…

Two-piece fly rods.

The game has changed a lot since then, and nowadays, a four-piece fly rod is very much ‘the norm’.

This is a good thing, and if you can, go for a four-piece fly rod.

Here’s why:

  • They are easier to transport
  • They are easier to store
  • They are easier to manage

If you have a fair walk to the water, the last thing you want to do is to be lugging a 5′ pole around with you.

Multi-piece fly rods are a breeze to carry around and easily fit in the trunk. They are also much less likely to get broken.

Durability

With the best will in the world, an expensive fly rod will be no good if it starts to corrode and rust.

Here’s the thing about all fishing rods.

They tend to get a little bit wet. You’ll find that the best fly fishing rods are constructed from materials that tend not to corrode easily.

Look for the materials such as titanium, aluminum, zinc, and other alloys that aren’t prone to rust. Try and stay away from steel.

Keep a close eye on the handle too! Go for the best quality cork you can afford, as this area of the rod is really prone to wear and tear.

small grayling caught while fly fishing

A Locking Reel Seat

This is another must in my book.

Ignore this advice at your peril…

Make sure you get a rod with a locking reel seat. Yep, friction rings are much cheaper and are a little bit vintage. There’s a reason you don’t see them so much anymore.

They don’t work!

You will be moving the rod constantly when you are casting and fishing. If your reel drops off your rod with every other cast, you are going to wind up frustrated, possibly with a damaged reel… or even a lost fish.

Do yourself a favor. Get a locking reel seat!

The Little Extras

We all enjoy getting more for less.

Right?

There are a few little extras that I always think sweeten the deal when it comes to buying a new fly fishing rod. And the sum of all these tiny parts makes a big difference.

Like what?

First off… I want a rod tube. Sure, a cloth bag looks all cute, but when I’ve got bent rod rings, I don’t like it quite as much.

A rod tube will protect your rod. You’d be amazed how much punishment a rod takes just sat in the back of your car.

I also like to see alignment dots on my rods to get the rod set up and be ready to fish in double-quick time.

Anything else?

Yeah, keep an eye out for things like rod identifiers on the handle. You won’t always get these, but they are a blessing.

Ever got down to the water with an 8wt rod and a 4wt line?

I have… Guess how many fish I caught that day?

By easily identifying your rod, you can make sure you have paired it up with the correct reel and line. It’s a mistake you’ll only make once.

Summary

There’s plenty of choices above, and hopefully, you’ll have seen that you don’t need to spend a fortune to get some of the best 4 weight fly rods out there.

Pick a fast action with a multi-piece design, and you’ll be flicking tiny dries onto the nose of the trout in no time at all!

While you are here, why not take a look at my other articles?

I love fly fishing and have all sorts of guides. If you are a beginner, check out my dedicated beginners fly rods article here… Or just check my list to make sure you have everything you need.

What’s your longest cast with a 4wt fly rod? Let me know in the comments.

Jamie Melvin

Growing up fishing on streams and lakes in Kenya and the UK, Jamie has traveled the world in search of fishing nirvana. From his time managing bonefish lodges in the Bahamas and running fishing safaris in East Africa, all the way to guiding on the flats of Seychelles and offshore, there are not many species or environments he hasn't experienced firsthand.

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